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How do you hold your carving?

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I've used sandbags in making holloware. While I haven't seen one made out of deerskin like yours, leather sand or metal shot bags are also used in the autobody business. I just checked their website, and Harbor Freight has them for $7. (Cheap shotbag) I'm not sure how much like your sandbag that would handle, but it's certainly cheap, if somebody wanted to try out the idea. You can find larger ones, often round, with thicker leather, at a variety of autobody supply shops. The leather on those may be a little too heavy for smaller carving, but nice for supporting larger/heavier pieces, and I like them for supporting pitchbowls, for chasing work.

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I've used sandbags in making holloware. While I haven't seen one made out of deerskin like yours, leather sand or metal shot bags are also used in the autobody business. I just checked their website, and Harbor Freight has them for $7. (Cheap shotbag) I'm not sure how much like your sandbag that would handle, but it's certainly cheap, if somebody wanted to try out the idea. You can find larger ones, often round, with thicker leather, at a variety of autobody supply shops. The leather on those may be a little too heavy for smaller carving, but nice for supporting larger/heavier pieces, and I like them for supporting pitchbowls, for chasing work.

 

Sounds like it might work for larger stuff.

But I know it wouldn't work for things like the little inch-long carving I'm working on in the top photo.

I do know that some scrim artists use sandbags, but I've never seen a half-full one like mine. I'm thinking that I might have actually come up with something new as far a being able to adjust the firmness.

LJ

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Does the fuzzy side hold onto the work a little through friction? Is the smooth side have less friction hold?

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Does the fuzzy side hold onto the work a little through friction? Is the smooth side have less friction hold?

 

Yep! I don't really use the smooth side. I thought it might be useful when I made this, but the slight traction of the sueded side turned out to be perfect.

LJ

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I carve mostly holding the piece in one hand and the tool in the other hand.

But sometimes I want to support the carving. I tried a wooden block but the carving tends to slip.

Then I got a tip from a fellow carver. (TCP member Hako) Wich works very good for me.

 

Take a sink plunger and cut off the handle. Make a wooden (or anything hard) insert to fit inside it.

You can place the carving in the middle or on the side. The rubber prevents slipping or damaging the carving.

 

Some pictures to illustrate what I mean.

 

Ko

 

post-142-1215708244.jpgpost-142-1215708214.jpg

post-142-1215708184.jpg

post-142-1215708194.jpg

post-142-1215708206.jpg

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Hi Ko, it is nice to see you here.

 

That is very clever! Thank you for the illustrations. Do you use this all of the time now?

 

Janel

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Thanks Janel, I use it more and more. It's in front of me while carving and I use it when some force is needed.

I also use it when I am scraping or sanding as a support.

With fine detailng work I hold the carving in my hand.

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I've done a ton of different things in my life that involved hand work like carving and have only the last couple years been doing that. A lot of the previous work carried forward in technique and "McGyvering" things to suit what felt right and seemed to be called for along the way. I used to do graphic arts, you know, before the computer, and a drafting table, lazy susan and typical desktop outlay is where it all started and largely still happens. That graphic work turned into tattooing in later years and my old chiropractor can attest to what that profession can do to your skeleton working in and around the human form to apply your works, while it jumps, complains, sweats and even orgasms (you don't wanna know) beneath the needle and ink and BLOOD!

 

Combine that with some jewelery making, gunsmithing, knifemaking awe (known some of the best that have lived, all I can do is sharpen!), and fly tying (seriously boring hobby, sorry) and a few others and I can carve standing on my head in a rainstorm. Being in the retail merch biz representing artists in differing mediums and disciplines has been a GOLD MINE in knowing HOW a lot of stuff is done, but it's still a far larger portion that remains a never-ending mystery and keeps life interesting too!

 

A jewelers vice on a ball joint is a handy thing and various rests for the elbow and body can be stacked/built/configured around this. An articulating arm with a fluorescent on the end of it-and in the last years a magnifying glass too-really helps with small stuff and detail work. The rest happens on the bandsaw and coping saw, belt sander and tabletop grinder and the most important thing I pay attention to there is not getting any of MY parts in the equipment!! I LOVE the sandbag idea and will put it immediately to use, I think one with lead shot or something heavier than sand might be useful too.

 

Awesome forum and topic, thanks to all for the fascination!!

 

Aloha!!

 

NobleHouse

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I've done a ton of different things in my life that involved hand work like carving and have only the last couple years been doing that. A lot of the previous work carried forward in technique and "McGyvering" things to suit what felt right and seemed to be called for along the way. I used to do graphic arts, you know, before the computer, and a drafting table, lazy susan and typical desktop outlay is where it all started and largely still happens. That graphic work turned into tattooing in later years and my old chiropractor can attest to what that profession can do to your skeleton working in and around the human form to apply your works, while it jumps, complains, sweats and even orgasms (you don't wanna know) beneath the needle and ink and BLOOD!

 

Combine that with some jewelery making, gunsmithing, knifemaking awe (known some of the best that have lived, all I can do is sharpen!), and fly tying (seriously boring hobby, sorry) and a few others and I can carve standing on my head in a rainstorm. Being in the retail merch biz representing artists in differing mediums and disciplines has been a GOLD MINE in knowing HOW a lot of stuff is done, but it's still a far larger portion that remains a never-ending mystery and keeps life interesting too!

 

A jewelers vice on a ball joint is a handy thing and various rests for the elbow and body can be stacked/built/configured around this. An articulating arm with a fluorescent on the end of it-and in the last years a magnifying glass too-really helps with small stuff and detail work. The rest happens on the bandsaw and coping saw, belt sander and tabletop grinder and the most important thing I pay attention to there is not getting any of MY parts in the equipment!! I LOVE the sandbag idea and will put it immediately to use, I think one with lead shot or something heavier than sand might be useful too.

 

Awesome forum and topic, thanks to all for the fascination!!

 

Aloha!!

 

NobleHouse

 

 

That's funny, I've done jewelry making (currently), carving (currently), Leatherwork (also current) and fly tying, and I found the latter to be really relaxing.

 

I did try shot in a sand bag, but unless you are doing really large carvings, it's too darned lumpy. If you use fine sand, it more than heavy enough.

LJ

 

PS: Janel, I finally have the black suede for your bag and will be making it shortly. I'll let ya know when it's done.

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