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Kozuka & kogatana


Niko Hynninen

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Hi all!

 

This is my attempt to create japanese touch on this hande Kozuka.

I tryed to make landscape of mountains and burning meteorites on atmosfare.

 

Pictures are first of all about the carved copper and mereorites silver and cold, but i didnt take the blade it self off..it fits like clowe.

 

I hope that you like what i greate here and give me feedback..any kind

Tools that i used where very simple, files, v-shape chisel, high-speed electric carving tool+ some differend heads for that, sandpaper,200-500mes ( very fine) kvarts sand and liver of sulfur for pantina.

 

I have to get some books and study more. This was interesting and deffenetly try to in prove my skills on carving.

 

 

Niko Hynninen / Finland

 

post-958-1172503215.jpg

 

Kogatana and kozuka

 

post-958-1172503242.jpg

 

Kozuka

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Hi Doug!

 

Thanks for your reply!

 

I think that the mountains dit work quite nice, but im not so pleased about meteorites....somethings

missing.. Maby im just too critical about my work.

 

Over all desing i try to keep as possible and my skills are bit limited B)

 

One question about those metorites? To greate movement and live like carving, dit i do some thing totally wrong here? Or is this kinda "image" difficult to greate?

 

But any ways i wanna thank you all to give fead back.

 

Thank´s

 

Niko

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Guest ford hallam

Hi Niko,

 

as you asked for some feedback here are a few comments which may be of some use to you.

 

Firstly, I must say that your subject matter is quite challenging, rendering a meteor shower was always going to be a tricky task. I think you've done quite well though but I wonder if the concept would have been easier to portray if you'd arranged it horizontally rather than vertically. You would have had more space to arrange the meteor shower along a longer horizon. If you consider that you attempted to do a skyscape with some mountains in such a narrow format, you we're very constricted and it is also very difficult to create a sense of perspective and distance in such a limited space.

 

The idea of the meteors in the night sky above a rocky outcrop or mountains is a nice one. I would suggest that you could have increased the textural interest and thereby also increased the visual contrast, by creating a more "rocky" mountain. By this I mean you could have carved the rocks more vigourously. Showing the texture of a rough surface on an object in the distance is quite difficult but in this case I feel you could have suggested more of the mountains overall feel. As it is, the surface is finished in a way that is too similar to the sky.

 

You seem a little unhappy with the look of the meteor shower itself. If you tried to make sure the tails all followed the same path you would create the impression that they have all come from the same direction. This also helps to convey the impression of a unified shower falling as one. Think of the rain falling and how you would show that. Another approach would be to show each tail as an individual spray having a slieght curve and arrange them in a "stepped" kind of way.

 

I'll see if I can't do a little sketch to better illustrate what I mean. I have to do some work now. I'll be back later.

 

regards, Ford

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Hello Ford!

 

 

Thanks for feedback, this is just what i wanted.

 

You got it right...i was not happy.

I think i but too many meteors in it, i should but only 2-3 no more. Like Jim said too. Thaks Jim!

The narrow space dit make it difficult to greate distance

 

You are absolytely right there should be more depth.

 

I draw some pictures, baset on you text. I think that i undertand the point what you tell me.

I hope it shows in my drawings.

 

I thought that this meteor shower whold be bit easyer... now i think totaly differenly. There is no easy way to greate something, you need skills and practice too.

 

Have to say that this is my first this type carving work. I have done some carving before but its totaly small scale and not even near work that i have seen here.

 

So overall im 50/50 happy an unhappy.

I think i try to prove this some... im bit worried that i ruin whole Kozuka. But if i ad or try to ad some texture in mountains so there is clear differens sky - mountains.

 

 

Drawings

 

post-958-1172758479.jpg

 

 

post-958-1172758511.jpg

 

 

post-958-1172758533.jpg

 

Regarts

 

Niko

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Guest ford hallam

Hi Niko,

 

your drawings are spot on, actually better than the sketch I was going to post, so I don't need to embarrass myself :o .

I would have to agree with Jim on the number too, as your new designs show, it works. One thing to consider though, if you do use many elements like this then you can always create a sense of rhythm in the way you arrange them. Imagine the notes on a sheet of music, the way they can wander along gently going up or down, but use your spacing to give the sense timing.

 

I think that if your technique is limited then it might be more effective to concentrate on just a few ( maybe 2 or 3 ) aspects on such small pieces.

 

A pretty promising start :) .

 

cheers, Ford

 

p.s. I don't think we can ever be too critical of our own work, the moment we stop going forward we begin to go backwards......

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Those revisions and sketches are right on the mark! I like the horizontal format best, and the reduction in number of meteors. You could get a nice rhythm going with the varying mountain heights contrasted by the placement of meteors. Keep at it! There's no reason why you can't keep working this theme and exploring ways to convey the meteor, its trail and the mountains in different techniques.

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Hi Guys!

 

 

Ford

 

 

Hymm...Now i think i embarrass myself whit my crawings :o

Ok thats just a joke.

 

The drawing is better than my craving.......Dam why i didnt carved like that.

I dit make different sketches on copper surface , but some how dit managet arrange them poorly.

 

You dit mention notes on sheet of music, This is god compare and i think this heps me to image my greation better. I try work this piece, but same time try not to demolish it totally.

 

 

Thats absolytely right: Im Newbie so just too critical, forward its direction :)

 

 

Doug

 

It looks totally different horisontaly. All ready it shows depth more than now.

Next time i make landscape horisontaly to see it on real material.

 

This is an new learnig proces but i like it.

 

 

Thank you all!

 

Niko

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Nice work, Niko. I've enjoyed the discussion here, and since I've been making knives with "scenes" on them lately, have an observation/question.

 

I notice Niko's scene, when viewed correctly would have the blade pointing up. The "scenes" I've tended to do would have the blade pointing down. I feel more "comfortable" with the blade pointing down. Any thoughts about this? Is there a "correct" way?

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Guest ford hallam

Hi Tom,

 

if you are referring to Japanese kozuka then, as you'd expect, there is a "correct" way to orientate the design. If the horizontal format is chosen, the edge of the blade is up ( and to the left ) and therefore the thicker edge of the kozuka is the lower edge. Incidentally, the word "kozuka" refers only to the handle, not the blade. "Ko" means small, and "zuka" is a contraction of " tsuka" meaning handle.

 

In the vertical format, the blade is at the top, edge to the right. The design is generally at the bottom and usually visually weighted from the left, as this is now the thicker edge of the kozuka.

 

Hope that makes sense. :o

 

regards, Ford

 

p.s. of course the comments I've made are only really pertinant to small blades which are the mounted on swords, like kozuka on katana. When the katana ( long sword ) is worn, it is carried edge up and generally thrust horizontally through the obi( sash) with the handle pointing to the front. In this position the kozuka is on the inside face of the saya ( scabbard ), ie, closest to the wearers body. You can now visualise why the design orientation is as it is.

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Hi all!

 

As all you who read my text knows that i wasn´t too satisfied after all...

 

Like i said i didt make some inprovements and try to fugure out the more " rocky" and modified the meteors.

This rock effect was difficult, it gave me terrible haedache...i now it not quite the rocky but i didt know how to greate it...so i dit imbrovise. If notting else now the mountains "pops out of the sky"

 

I noticed that whole thing become more challenging than i eaven imagine.

 

 

Here some pic.

 

post-958-1173029937.jpg

 

post-958-1173030010.jpg

 

post-958-1173030031.jpg

 

 

I think it look better now. :o

 

Niko

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I love the piece but disagree somewhat concerning the number and orientation of the meteorites. From a reality point of view, meteorites seldom "fall" in a top to bottom fashion. They commonly, in what is termed a shower, appear to originate from a single location in the sky. Hence we have the Perseid shower each August and the Leonids in November. Otherwise, they are random streaks that shoot across the sky appearing to fly in a more or less horizontal fashion. Also, they seldom explode causing a secondary cascade of sparks but appear to originate from a point and disappear at the end of a shallow arc. I know this may sound picky and critical, but I feel the sense of time/space compression we seek in such works needs to be closer, not further away from reality regardless of how abstract or non-representational the work itself may be. Contradiction? Yes, but when it works, it is magnificent.

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Guest ford hallam
From a reality point of view,

 

perhaps this artist is less concerned about "reality"? most real artists are more concerned with expressing or evoking feelings and emotions. If you want accurate images of natural phenomena perhaps National Geographic would be a better bet. :D Of course there are those who judge art by its fidelity to the model, but frankly, the less said about them the better. ;)

 

 

I feel the sense of time/space compression we seek in such works needs to be closer, not further away from reality regardless of how abstract or non-representational the work itself may be.

 

Surely this is an opinion?. As such, what you feel is not always going to be relevant to everyone. In any case, I'm not too clear on what you actually mean, could you elaborate for us? Some examples of what you are getting at would be really helpful. Perhaps some of those magnificent ones that work, that you mentioned. :)

 

regards, Ford ( the provocative :o )

 

p.s. do we call you rmiller3 ? or do you have a more user friendly name? :)

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Sorry, didn't mean to be distant. I am Ralph, my friends call me Ralph, my mother used to call me RALPH!!!

 

And I didn't have any particular piece in mind except the magnificent day lilly with snow cricket on it done by Janel which we now own. The sense of an entire garden as represented by an opening flower bud but given to scale by the cricket is incredible. And, yes it is an opinion certainly. Didn't mean to be confrontational. In fact, most of my work is highly abstract (except for some like my little piece under my name to the left.).

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Guest ford hallam

Hello Ralph,

 

welcome to this fraternity. :)

 

I'm not familiar with the piece you cite ( of Janels ) but knowing her work, and the lady herself ( not intimately! :) .....yet :D ) I have an inkling of what you were intimating.

 

My concern in this forum is that as so many veiwers may not have actual access to the objects we are refering to, we need to be very specific, and provide at least some validation of our commentary.

 

Art appreciation ( and critique ) is not a democratic activity...we must always be willing to subject our opinions to uncomfortable assesment. Only then do we stand a chance of learning from each other and growing.

 

very best regards, Ford B)

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We met Janel at the annual Craft Show in Philadelphia some years ago and immediately fell in love with her work. We have a celadon piece, the snow cricket, the wasp nest and a grape leaf. They were all done in the late 90's. As Janel doesn't exhibit at Philadelphia any longer (sob), we haven't seen her in some time. But I can unreservedly recommend her as a wonderful person. Here's the place on her website with our day lilly and snow cricket.

 

http://www.janeljacobson.com/carvings/295.html

 

Ralph

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