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Waterfall screen


Jim Kelso

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This has been taking form since last September. I'll try to get a better photo after I work on the detailing.

The water, which looks pink now, is five pieces of shibuichi in varying alloys(3) which will be darker toward the background when patinated. There is also a dark shibuichi(looks pink now also) piece that is to represent rock. It's the vertical piece toward the right that comes out of the water. Much work still remains.

post-4-1172692696.jpg

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Hi Jim!

 

What can i say......all ready there is movemet...its beautiful

In middle of the fall is rock, this spot is my faworite one...if i can even say that. Whole theme is a beauty.

 

Pic left upper corner is some vertical carving, is it also waterfall but its in distance.?

 

I think it will come clear to me when this is ready :o

 

Niko

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Jim, your work is so outrageously "cool", for the lack of a better word, that it's scary!

 

How large is this piece? What is the black framing material for the shibuichi, ebony perhaps?

 

What an inspiration! Let's see, a waterfall on a fountain pen or a knife handle. . .

 

David

 

Okay, I'm Mr. Visual. Saw the picture and forgot about the text. I see it's ebony, Jim.

 

This layering technique would work well on a folding knife handle. Sort of an offshoot of the window frame technique, but much more detailed and dimensional. I can also see this technique used on a writing instrument, but would be more difficult.

 

You've really got me thinking, Jim!

 

David

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  • 4 weeks later...

Thanks Mark. Water is an interesting challenge. This piece was modeled after a lacquer and ink screen painting by Shibata Zeshin. It's not uncommon in Japan to interpret paintings into other media. I'll post the painting when I can get to making a scan of it. Here is a little closer view. Still lots to do in subtle texturing, polishing and patination.

post-4-1175284278.jpg

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Aloha Karl & thanks. The painting gives clues, and a fairly conventional painting technique is to create depth by the use of darker colors toward the background. I chose the particular alloys as I had experience with them and can get reliable shades. More to follow.

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Aloha Jim,

 

Thanks for the insight. I am assembling ingredients (using Sugimori's recipes as a guide) for my patina trials. I seem to have a long way to go. (Feel like an alchemist.)

We have some fine examples of Shibata's work locally. I go to see them for inspiration. (For anyone not familiar with Shibata Zeshin, check him out.)

 

mahalo

Karl

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Aloha Jim,

 

We have some fine examples of Shibata's work locally. I go to see them for inspiration. (For anyone not familiar with Shibata Zeshin, check him out.)

 

mahalo

Karl

 

I'm envious! There is a fantastic new exhibition at the San Antonio Art Museum with a wonderful catalogue with work I haven't seen before. Highly recommended.

 

San Antonio Museum of Art

 

Also, you may find this helpful:

 

Patina Tutorial

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Aloha Jim,

 

The patina tutorial was one my first introductions into the forum. I've been over it numerous times. Thanks. Am waiting to hear if an aquaintence is bringing back a migaki-bake back from Japan. He went over with a shopping list for metal carving chisels and I have imposed once again. Oh, the guilt.

By the way, the chisels were listed by "red label" and "blue label", which I understand denotes for non-ferrous and ferrous work, respectively. There was a price difference. In your experience, is there really a noticeable difference between the two? I am at a crossroads; Japanese tools, shopmade, powered or (probably) a combinationof all.

Anyone else have an opinion?

 

mahalo

Karl

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Guest ford hallam

Hi Karl,

 

Patrick and I have pretty much covered the differences between the two. :) on the "something fishy" thread.

 

Anyone else have an opinion?

 

do I have an opinion? oh yes! :D ,

 

I could go on at length, and probably will at some point shortly :D , but I maintain that if you are intent on discovering the fullest range of possibilities these traditional processes offer, or want to develop the kind of skills needed to work in a similarly expressive way as the masters of the past, then there is only one approach that will allow that. There is perhaps, a slightly longer learning phase with chisels but in my experience, once you get to grips with then you can really begin to understand how so much incredibly delicate work was done. As for speed or ease, I will challenge any electro-powered carver to a chisel off any time. :):(

 

oh! and sticking with the chisels and hammers is more environmentally friendly. Less power consumption and if there is a power out you can continue by candle-light.

 

Just my 2 yens worth :( , cheers,

Ford

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Guest ford hallam

Hey Patrick,

 

your thoughts on the transition to working solely with chisels may be of help and interest at this point.

 

and the image of you huddled over your pitch bowl chipping away by candle-light will keep a silly grin on my face today. :D Now That's dedication!

 

cheers, Ford

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Aloha Jim,

 

The patina tutorial was one my first introductions into the forum. I've been over it numerous times. Thanks. Am waiting to hear if an aquaintence is bringing back a migaki-bake back from Japan. He went over with a shopping list for metal carving chisels and I have imposed once again. Oh, the guilt.

By the way, the chisels were listed by "red label" and "blue label", which I understand denotes for non-ferrous and ferrous work, respectively. There was a price difference. In your experience, is there really a noticeable difference between the two? I am at a crossroads; Japanese tools, shopmade, powered or (probably) a combinationof all.

Anyone else have an opinion?

 

mahalo

Karl

 

Aloha Karl,

 

It seems your question on red tang/blue tang has been answered elsewhere. :D The reds are lovely for chasing and come in a wide variety of shapes that can be further custom shaped and hardened to your needs. I have a spare bake floating around somewhere if your friend does not come through. The question of tool selection is a very individual and personal matter, based on many considerations, which I'm sure you can sort through. A mix works very well for me.

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