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Nunome zogan or Japanese cloth weave overlay.


Guest ford hallam

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Guest ford hallam

Hi Greg,

 

I'm glad that my small offering drew you out of the shadows, so to speak. :D and pleased that you were tempted to "give it another go".

 

The technique you seem to be trying to get to grips with is actually an entirely different method of inlay compared to that which I've shown here. ( I'm sure you realise that though. ) I'll post a detailed tutorial on wire inlay specifically, as soon as I can. There are at least 3 distinct ways to go about it, depending on the effect you're after and the surface material. I'll post images and spec's of the chisels used also.

 

I would suggest that the 2 most important aspects in terms of getting your inlay tidy would be good magnification and very fine, and delicate, tools. A light touch is helpful too ;) , no pounding of anything! :rolleyes: , just teasing ;) .

 

I will be doing a series of detailed tutorials dealing with all the basics of classical Japanese metalwork on my website but I'll see if I can't knock up a quick preview of a simplified wire inlay process and post it tomorrow some time.

 

later then, cheers,

Ford B)

 

any more metal bashers out there?

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Guest katfen

How about a WANNABE metal basher? That'd be me! :rolleyes:

 

Ford, you're truly inspired with all you've posted as late. Now I must go out and get proper tools to delicately bash metal with....now where to get them?

 

Regards,

 

Kathleen

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Hi Ford

 

thank you for your response... sorry i didn't get back to you earlier...

( migraine took some time from me :rolleyes:

 

 

i'm guilty of hitting things too hard... as is a good thing when you are forging blades out, quickly..

 

however ... i saw that incredible cool hammer you are using... and i thought that may help me with my tendency to clobber the chisels...

 

so i made a somewhat similar hammer from W1 roundstock.. and hand shaped the handle from sugar maple..

 

by the way...what is this hammer called

 

DSC03737.jpg

 

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e396/dim...pt/DSC03736.jpg

 

 

I do realize that the inlay i tried is fundamentally different from yours... i thought i'd try a basic technique before attempting that one... woof

 

i've restored numerous shamshir and tulwar... so i've seen lots of overlay in gold.... but never attempted it.....after seeing your tutorial... it answered so many questions...

 

one last thing.......i've read several accounts that said the Indian smiths used lime to clean the area and the metal to be inlayed.... .. is this necessary

 

 

take care

Greg

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Guest ford hallam

Hi Greg,

 

sorry I've not got that info on wire inlay up yet, somewhat distracted figuring out how to actually build web-sites, finally! :rolleyes: I'll get into the studio in an hour or two.

 

Your hammer is brilliant, and a great example to others too. Perhaps a tutorial on hammer making? ;)

Hammers are simply called "kanazuchi" in Japanese workshops, I haven't really heard any specialist terms. We don't use any form of etchant on the ground but it does pay to keep it clean and grease free. I tend to cover a prepared ground by simply taping a piece of paper over it if I must leave it for a while, to keep it dust free etc.

 

cheers, Ford

 

p.s. I just noticed one little thing I'd suggest you could adjust to make your hammer absolutely perfect. If you place the hammer face down on a flat surface with the handle resting on that surface, the face of the hammer ought to be parallel with the surface. Does that make sense? This ensures that as the hammer is swung the face strikes the head of the chisel more accurately. It's a minor detail but it makes a difference.

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Hi Ford

 

yes.....that is a plan... i'll do a kanazuchi hammer tutorial ... .. i'll do it stock removal because not every one has a blacksmith anvil ...

 

thanks for the tip on hammer handle angle... i can see that it is 1/4 of an inch out of parallel... which i can fix

 

 

Greg :rolleyes:

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Guest ford hallam

Hi Greg,

 

here's an image of some of the hammer heads I use, the ruler should give you an idea of size. The smallest is specifically for very fine nunome. The next is for nunome too. The 3rd one is used mainly for inlay work and fine carving and the last for carving iron and steel or when I want to remove lots of material quickly. You can see what I mean about the faces being flat on the surface when the end of the handle also rests on the surface. It all helps ;) .

 

Stock removal would certainly be the way to go. I'm sure lots of people would find your approach helpful.

 

cheers, Ford :rolleyes:

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  • 2 months later...
Looks fairly big to be very effective Nunome Zogan, doesn't it?

 

Yep, but it might be a cheese cloth or burlap variation, "o-numone zogan"? how does one say burlap in japanese? :rolleyes:

I've heard of roughening the ground and mercury-gilding over it, which would be another way to get something to look like this...

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Guest ford hallam

Hi Jeff,

 

I don't think there is any question that this is nunome. I think you're right too in calling it O-nunome :D .

 

This tsuba is a bit of a puzzle for me, the overall shape is good but the nakago ana ( the hole for the tang in the centre; for you non-sword folks ;) ) bothers me. The workmanship of the decoration suggests to me that it was done by someone with very little experience. My guess would be that it was done by an enthusiastic collector on an undecorated old tsuba.

 

just my 5 yens worth. :)

Namaste, Ford

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Guest ford hallam

Hi Hyllyn,

 

it's a bit hard to say to what degree of coarseness or fineness of the cut ground may affect the durability of the foil. The thickness of the applied metal and the ground material itself probably also play a part. What you can see however, is that when, as inevitably happens, the gold or silver is so worn down that all that remains are the bits actually trapped in the cuts themselves. As such, the finer cut ground will generally retain more of the original gold, or silver. That's if it was worked in well enough in the first place ;) .

 

Hope this clarifies things a little, regards, Ford

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The workmanship of the decoration suggests to me that it was done by someone with very little experience.

 

Yes, it is unusual, and something about the scale of the design seems off, too. Even in work where the maker was trying to be 'rustic' or 'antique' I've never seen cherry blossoms rendered in this way, and beginner apprentices don't get to execute final designs in the Japanese system... ;)

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...

First let me tell you all what a treat to find a place like this with folks as passionate about the craft and art. I have been working in metal for nearly 40yrs and never tire of learning and sharing.

 

Ford, I had the pleasure of assisting in two workshops on Uchidashi taught by Eleanor Moty. I had the opportunity to make several sets of a half dozen tools to specifications recorded by Al Ching during the workshop taught by Satsuo Ando in the 70's. The blanks were ordered from Komokin. This was my introduction to my addiction for fine Japanese metalwork.

 

I will share pieces in my collection in the coming weeks.

 

Thank you all!

Fred

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  • 1 month later...

Hi folks,

 

One tsuba in iron with wire nunome ( gold 0.25mm )and fuchi in copper ( the same wire).

post-1375-1191632545.jpg

post-1375-1191632556.jpg

post-1375-1191632522.jpg

post-1375-1191632530.jpg

 

Many thanks Ford for share this tecnics,

 

I hope learn more and refine the lines and work.

 

Remo

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Nice fittings, Remo. It makes me want to try this really soon too. Did you use pure gold? and the copper itself was hard enough to grip the gold too? (I would have thought that their hardnesses would be too similar).

 

Looking forward to seeing the whole sword, if that's what you have in mind,

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Hi Brian,

 

I use pure gold 0.26 mm thick,

the fuchi realy in not in cooper but in shakudo ~ 3 % gold. but i think in copper work too.

I make this for learn not is for especific sword . i will make others tsubas for training more. In this moment i 'm making 6 swords , but in more simple moutings ( casting brass ) , in blades without hamon and hada, only one have hamon in sae 1070 steel ,tradicional polish. but in the next year i hope making one more fine katana ( hamon, traditional polish an hada in sae 1045 and 1070 steel ) .

 

It's my first experience ,in nunome inaly

 

 

I think Ford can explaine more questions about this tecnic.

 

Regards,

 

Remo

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