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What is on your work bench this spring or autumn?


Janel

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well, I have a workbench on my workbench... :)

tired of working primarily on the floor and on the kitchen table, I am making a desk/workbench so I may work in comfort.

I've only just ordered the wood from my local lumberyard so I hope to have it by next week or so... In the meantime I should be polishing a slab of marble that will be the benchtop.

 

cheers

-t

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Guest ford hallam

hey Toscano,

 

would that be a birthday present for yourself? All the best and I hope to see wonderful things come to life on your bench. :)

 

cheers, Ford

 

p.s. Janel.....I'm in Africa, how do you know that there isn't a big hairy baboon on my bench. :)

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Hi Janel,

 

I have two pieces, well really just blocks of wood at the moment, on the go. One large, and one small.

 

The large one is a slab of basswood about 40" X 40"X 4" thick, and has been prepared for a commission that I have to carve a coat of arms for an organization. In the end, it will be painted and gilded, and it is expected to take about a year to complete.

 

The second is a small piece of boxwood, with some smaller bits of pink ivory and mammoth ivory, that I am going to turn into an apple blossom pendant, inspired by the buds that are about to burst open in my yard. Just contemplating the design right now, but I hope to start this weekend.

 

Sorry, not much to photograph right now, but I will keep you posted as things progress.

 

Phil

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Guest katfen

Hi Janel,

 

Well, this is the beginnings of one thing on my bench. The rest, I don't have pics of at the moment.

 

post-27-1178663883.jpg

 

As to what keeps me coming back...well, no one else is going to do the work for me....

Unless there are some little elves I could get to do it for nothing... :)

 

Kathleen

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Guest ford hallam
what exactly is it?

 

looks like an ingrown toenail to me! :DB)

 

Toscano,

I'm patiently waiting for one small area of metal to develop the "right" colour on the present piece. Then I will reveal all. :) The moon and clouds motif that I demonstrated the silver overlay process on is actually the reverse of this kagamibuta. The front has a design of wind blown banana leaves in the rain, rendered in 2 tones of brass/bronze type alloys and a tiny bit of silver, raised inlay and carved. Not long now. And the web-site is now officially "in labour" ETA, sometime very soon. :)

 

Hyllyn, you're a very naughty boy! ;) those scatological thoughts of yours could get you into trouble :):D You'd better be careful, or you'll get scolded too. :D

 

well, that me all cheery this morning, best regards to all, Ford B)

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post-683-1178721031.jpgpost-683-1178721051.jpgpost-683-1178721066.jpgpost-683-1178721080.jpgHi Janel, hi all. I just finished two pieces for Thiers knifeshow. Two little pieces, one is ebony and the second boxwood. Boxwood is 45 mm long, ebony is 35 mm. The idea is to make little knife for a little price. The theme is barbarian spirit, we make that like a game, not very serious.
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Guest ford hallam

Hi Sergio,

 

those are really nice sculptural pieces. I like the way you combined the 2 elements, very direct and perfectly suitable. I take it the measurements you gave are just the lengths of the skulls.

 

excellent :)

 

regards, Ford :)

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Very nice work Sergio.

I particularly like how the texture and colour of the ebony lends a 'grittier' edge to the skull.

 

-t

 

It's musk ox and quite interesting to work. :)

 

So, horn then. Do the fibers that run across it make it a challenge to work with?

I have never carved horn but it seems to me that it would be a very different game to bone or ivory.

 

-t

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Salutos los amigos! The dimensions of the knives are 20 cm, the skrulls: 4,5 and 3,5 cm. I fixed them with "super glu" ( cyanocrilate ). Those objects are such paper knives, so they don't need an important fixation, they are made for decoration. The blade is damascus.

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Guest katfen
So, horn then. Do the fibers that run across it make it a challenge to work with?

I have never carved horn but it seems to me that it would be a very different game to bone or ivory.

 

-t

 

Yup, horn. You're quite right, it is a very different game to bone or ivory. Working it changes according to the depth it's carved and what's naturally present in that particular piece of material. The fibres like to be worked in some directions and not in others. Almost like grain. It's one of those materials that needs to be worked in order to be understood. Then much practice follows... ;)

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Sergio,

 

Very nice work. I really like the form of these knives.

 

Kaften,

 

I thought that was muscox horn. A friend of mine spent a summer in the arctic a few years ago, and brought me back a couple of muscox horns and some caribou antler. Horn is nice stuff. Sort of like a cross between wood and ivory. It also has good machining properties, and even be tapped and threaded with taps and dies.

 

I'm looking forward to seeing what you will do with it.

 

Phil

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Hi Folks!

Nothing on my bench right now, but I did two pieces a few weeks ago for a Bienal selection (I don´t know the traduction of that one...but I think that it´s written Biennale) and tomorrow they give the results of it. I´ll try to post some photos. The thing is that the last two pieces were done with thousands of TCP tips and I´m so happy with it that I´ll use them all-ways!!! :D

Changing subjects here: nails and horns are "cousins" ;) Isn´t Damascus too much for paper knives?! I´d like one for my bench... :P

HUGHS FROM ARGENTINA ( passing a very cold autumn )

Sebas

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Hi Janel,

 

I am finishing up a pair of knives, a folding dagger and a fixed blade that make a set. I've carved the blades and the bronze handle overlays. The bronze parts form a "picture frame" that sits over titanium plates. These plates will be sent to an engraver for dragonflies.

 

Right after these I have two rather complicated folders to make, a fairly basic knife, then a large fixed blade with damascus steel, koa wood, and gold. Next week. . . just kidding! ;)

 

Sometime in the next week or two I have to finish a knife for a museum show this summer.

 

For much of this past week it's rained here, but it's supposed to be clear late this week. With nice weather I like to get out and ride my motorcycle. It helps me deal with stress and keeps me sane!

 

What keeps me coming back to the bench? I get hungry! I do this for a living so I have to work. Fortunately, I like my job. I have several nice knife and pen projects over the next few months, so I'll enjoy what I have to make. One specific thing that has me thinking is a fountain pen with a waterfall theme. Watching Jim's sculpture take shape has me inspired, and keeps me coming to the drawing board!

 

David

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Morning folks,

A couple of projects coming close to completion. The kneeling figure is Mary at the Annunciation, Hope is a carving and logo for a charity for survivors of traumatic brain injuries and the other piece is a study for a larger work. Mary's hands will be attached and carved next.

I generally have 5 projects in various stages going at once, keeps things moving and interesting. Sorry the photos aren't the best.

post-727-1178823448.jpg

post-727-1178823481.jpg

post-727-1178823510.jpg

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Nice work Mark!

 

Reminds me of Eric Gill, one of my favourite 20th century sculptors. I like the way the drapery is developing. I often add hands, etc., as part of the process. For some reason a lot of carvers frown on this process, however, it was standard practice for most of the best master carvers of the past centuries.

 

Is this basswood? Will it be finished au naturel?

 

Sebas, Also a nice piece! The colour is fine on my screen. What are the materials? Also, pardon my ignorance, but what is the stylistic influence? Maori?

 

Phil

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