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Persian Stiletto


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Hi Folks,

 

Attached is a picture of my recently finished "Persian Stiletto". I've had a billet of meteorite damascus in my shop for several years that was the right size and shape, but I haven't taken the time to use it until I was asked to participate in a museum show this summer. This event is a knife show at the National Ornamental Metal Museum in Memphis, Tennessee. The museum's web site is http://www.metalmuseum.org/ I'll post more info on the show over in the Events section.

 

The stiletto's slim blade is made from O-1 tool steel with about 10% iron/nickel meteorite. The knife's guard was carved from mild steel with various textures and heat blued. The handle is curly koa. The sterling pin has my "B" maker's mark.

 

If you are in Memphis this summer please go by the museum.

 

Questions and comments are always welcome, even if you don't like the knife! Thanks for looking.

 

David

post-322-1181406384.jpg

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Guest ford hallam

Hi David,

 

that is simply beautiful ;) , sensual, sinuous, sensual, sleek...it's illiterative (sic) too :huh: . But seriously, that is a lovely piece of work. Great choice for the wood too. It does have something of a kris about it too.

 

Congratulations.

 

regards, Ford

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Aloha David,

 

Beautiful work. I am struck by a sense of motion with the patterning on the blade through the curls of the koa handle. The overall curve ties it together. I love koa (I've salvaged three or four trees.). Where did you come by it?

Not to be critical of your photography, but wouldn't the patterns show better on a neutral background?

 

Karl

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Thanks, folks.

 

Ford, you have quite a vocabulary!

 

Karl, I have koa gathered by someone in Hawaii, and I have access to much more. Even though it's a protected species, it's readily available. Koa is one of my favorite woods to work. I chose curly koa because I felt it complimented the pattern in the damascus. The blade is a twist pattern, but it is so tight that the pattern lines run almost straight across the blade. You are possibly correct about the photo, but getting my photographer to do anything but what she wants is pretty hard. Can't fire her because she's my wife! I'll show her your post and she can fuss at you and not me!

 

Kathleen, off the top of my head the OAL is around 15", give or take a bit.

 

I appreciate the comments.

 

David

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David,

this a beautiful stiletto. I think the pairing of koa and this damascus works extremely well.

And they were brought together with finesse.

 

What would such a blade be used for/as?

Looks like a good blade to slice sashimi with :huh:

 

best

-t

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Hi David,

Wonderful knife. I go along with Ford's comments describing it's beauty. I like the way the damascus pattern and the shape of the blade relate so well. The National Ornamental Metal Museum is a great place. I was in a show of medallic sculpture there a couple of years ago.

Dick

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David,

this a beautiful stiletto. I think the pairing of koa and this damascus works extremely well.

And they were brought together with finesse.

 

What would such a blade be used for/as?

Looks like a good blade to slice sashimi with :angry:

 

Thanks everyone!

 

This knife is not so much a slicer as it is a sticker. Might be better for shish kabobs! :D In the real world Italian stilettos were long skinny "needle" like blades often used in two blade fencing. This knife incorporates many of the design elements I use on my Persian style knives, and with the slim and pointy blade it became a "Persian Stiletto" even though Persian and Italy are a long way apart!

 

Dick, I'm hoping that this museum show and others like it will let people outside the usual knife collecting circles see that some of our knives are actually art, not just tools.

 

Jeff, I did not make the damascus myself. I live in Texas where it's already hot enough without a forge! I believe the meteorite was from Gabon. It's mostly iron with 6-7% nickel. Not all meteorite shows the widmanstaetten pattern and that was used in the damascus. If I recall correctly, it was sliced (to check for pattern) then stacked with the O-1 tool steel in the proper proportions. From there is was worked like any other damascus - forged welded, hammered out, cut, restacked, and over again until a number of layers were built up. By the way, the 10% figure was used because iron with 7% nickel won't absorb carbon and therefore would not harden, and having 90% high carbon tool steel still gave the damascus a decent blade quality. The nickel content left those layers bright.

 

The handle pin is two parts. The actual cross pin is sterling rod coming through from the other side. What you see is a small cast sterling button I have made with my trademark "B" on it. I place them on all my fountain pens and have started using them on some of my art knives.

 

David

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Samuel, up at the pierced ricasso the thickness is around 3/16", maybe just a bit more. It tapers a bit going toward the point, then has a subtle swell behind the point area.

 

Glad you like the pens. I've enjoyed making them these last few years. It's certainly been different from the knives!

 

Thanks,

 

David

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I find that I don't know what is what with a sword or knife, with all of the parts and fittings and furniture. Could someone find an illustration which shows the sword or knife parts with good detail (both English and Japanese names when appropriate), and post it in a new topic with a really appropriate name? That sort of reference would be so helpful, at least to me :D !

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